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FAQs

Why Should I choose a Pediatric Dentist?

All dentists complete a four-year dental school program, but pediatric dentists go on to perform two to three more years of specialized training focusing on children. This training gives dentists the experience and knowledge needed to work specifically on infants to teenagers. The very young, pre-teens, and teenagers all need different approaches in dealing with their behavior, guiding their dental growth and development, and helping them avoid future dental problems.

Finding a Pediatric Dentist

Some dental practices set up their dental offices to treat children, but they do not have specialized training. It is legal for non-pediatric dentists to treat children, but if you are looking for a dentist with specialized training, you must ask specifically if the dentist is a pediatric dentist.
When should l take my child in for the first dental exam?
In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears or no later than his/her first birthday. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) and the American Dental Association (ADA) support the concept of a "Dental Home," which is the ongoing relationship between the dentist who is the Primary Dental Care Provider and the patient, and includes comprehensive oral health care, beginning no later than age one.
When will my babies teeth come in? 
There are variations in the age of the teeth eruption but you can use this table as a guide:

Upper Primary Teeth

When tooth emerges (Eruption)

When tooth falls out (Exfoliation)

Central incisor

8 to 12 months

6 to 7 years

Lateral incisor

9 to 13 months

7 to 8 years

Canine (cuspid)

16 to 22 months

10 to 12 years

First molar

13 to 19 months

9 to 11 years

Second molar

25 to 33 months

10 to 12 years

Lower Primary Teeth

When tooth emerges (Eruption)

When tooth falls out (Exfoliation)

Central incisor

6 to 10 months

6 to 7 years

Lateral incisor

1o to 16 months

7 to 8  years

Canine (cuspid)

17 to 23 months

9 to 12 years

First molar

14 to 18 months

9 to 10 years

Second molar

23 to 31 months

10 to 12  years








As seen from the chart, the first teeth can begin to break through the gums at about 6 months old, however some babies first teeth come after the first birthday. This is a normal variation and should not be a cause for concern.
What about x-rays?

Dental X-rays are a useful diagnostic tool when helping your dentist detect damage and disease not visible during a regular dental exam. How often X-rays should be taken depends on present oral health, age, risk for disease, and any signs and symptoms of oral disease. For example, children may require X-rays more often than adults because their teeth and jaws are still developing, and their teeth are more likely to be affected by tooth decay than those of adults. Your dentist will review your history, examine your mouth and then decide whether or not you need X-rays.

Dental X-ray exams are safe. They require very low levels of radiation exposure, which makes the risk of potentially harmful effects very small, even less with the new digital technology.  Dental X-ray tools and techniques are designed to limit the body's exposure to radiation, and every precaution is taken to ensure that radiation exposure is As Low As Reasonably Achievable (the ALARA principle). A leaded apron minimizes exposure to the abdomen and should be used when any dental radiograph is taken. Also, a leaded thyroid collar can protect the thyroid from radiation, and should also be used whenever possible. The use of a leaded thyroid collar is recommended for women of childbearing age, pregnant women and children.

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/x/x-rays.aspx

What if my baby is grinding his/her teeth?

Grinding in children is actually very common and in most cases nothing to worry about. Children and adults grind their teeth for many reasons; however, the complications from this are slightly different in adults than in children.

Common causes for grinding in children include changes in their existing bite due to the eruption and movement of the permanent and baby teeth. Because of these rapid changes, the body will sometimes make attempts by grinding to put the jaw in a more natural position as it relates to the jaw joint.

Most of the time children’s teeth grinding stops when the permanent dentition is complete and no treatment is needed, but if grinding continues an appliance could be indicated.




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